Can Children Really Learn by Playing Virtual Games?

As a  parent and teacher I have to always find creative ways to teach. I realized that children learn at different paces and in different ways. I am currently learning how to use technology to teach children.

I am a certified substitute teacher for the State of New Jersey. I am in schools from Trenton to Camden to Washington Township. I’ve seen first hand how students are taught different and how some schools and teachers have access to modern day technology to accommodate their teaching in classrooms and some do not. I recently covered for a teacher of a special education class. In the lesson plans each student was assigned their own laptop to use to play educational math and reading games. From my observance the children really enjoyed learning and were able to use what they learned in the classroom assignments. I’ve also worked in schools where the teachers barely had chalk to write on the boards and the students were not that interested in what was being taught. One day I was covering for a teacher who did not leave a lesson plan for me to follow. I had to reach into my own bag of creative teacher tricks to engage the children. Not just in learning the particular subject but to also make it interesting. We talked about the reasons they love math and the reasons they hate it. I decided to put the students in groups and worked with each group one on one to learn a little more about each student.  I learned that most of the students would rather play Xbox or PS4 than do homework.  So when I ran across this article http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/11/26/how-virtual-games-can-help-struggling-students-learn. I remembered my days working in that Camden class room with those students who were not interested in math but more interested in video games.                                      

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3 thoughts on “Can Children Really Learn by Playing Virtual Games?

  1. I forget who did the studies, but there have been a few on this topic. Video games are interactive literature. One study that stuck out to me (although I read it years ago) said that students were developing better spacial reasoning skills because of the large playable areas in sandbox games like Fable and Skyrim.

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